“From Sting to Spin”, the 2nd edition is published!

From Sting to Spin. Gillian Edom (2019)

The wait is over! The second edition of “From Sting to Spin” is now available.

We have created a little website with more details about the book, a few chapter previews and how to purchase it.
The web address is https://gillianedomsbook.blogspot.com.

I hope you will enjoy browsing the website and learning a bit more about my book From Sting to Spin (2nd edition, 2019).

Happy browsing!

Allan Brown demonstrates the processes he takes nettle plants through, in order to extract a usable fibre for textiles. ‘Nettles For Textiles’ was shot and edited by Dylan Howitt.

Working with green nettles – no retting

A short film demonstrating how to extract strong, fine fibres from ‘green’ nettle plants to create thread. It also looks back into time and explores how our Neolithic ancestors may have been processing nettles to extract fibre for textiles. Allan processes the green nettles ‘wet’, i.e. directly or very shortly after collecting.

Nettle processing – by Allan Brown

You’ve seen the video(s), now you can read in detail the various processes that Allan uses in order transform nettles into textiles too.
The document is still evolving, any comments let us know 🙂

Allan Brown_NettleProcessing.pdf

If you would like to use any parts of this document, please check with Allan and cite as follows:
Brown, Allan. NETTLES FOR TEXTILES (2017), www.nettlesfortextiles.org.uk

Connecting through craft

Hot off the press: Allan has been featured on ‘A tactile life’, a website that brings together  a ‘community of makers and hands-on humans’

Read the inspiring stories of our ever-growing community of makers and hands-on humans, and find out how to support their work
or begin your own journey towards developing your unique crafts and a tactile way of life.

Read the interview in full (Opens new window or tab)

 

Retting (Dew Retting)

Due to popular demand a post on retting:

Here we are talking specifically about ‘dew retting’ – which involves laying your nettle stems on the ground, usually a grassy area and allowing the dew and possibly rain to aid in the process of breaking down the gums and pectin that bind the bast to the woody core of the plant. ‘Retting’ will aid you in the removal of the bast (outer skin and fibre) from the ‘woody core’ of the plant.
 

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